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Texas Medical Cannabis Law: A Legislation Full of Faults
Author: Alice 23/11/2017 - 16:24:00

November 23, 2017 Texas 

Texas has been long known as the torchbearer of the supposed war on drugs. However, it is a lesser known fact that two years ago the state ratified a legislation with the name Compassionate Use Act, which legalized the consumption of medical cannabis. 

The bill was criticized due to its red tapping and snail paced implementation. It gave more than two years to the State’s Department of Public Safety for the licensing of only three MMJ dispensaries. The deadline for this licensing was September 1, 2017, but the date came and went without approval of two of the three dispensaries. 

Still, the first approved MMJ dispensary hasn’t started its operations. It is believed to open in the first week of December. With legalized MMJ is just on the doorsteps of Texas, here are all the necessary things you must know about the state’s medical cannabis laws. 

When will medical marijuana be available in the state? 

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Two MMJ dispensaries have been granted full authorization to operate from the state administration. The third one has been granted a partial approval and soon it might get the full licensure. Consortium Texas, the first MMJ dispensary got its license on the day of the deadline (September 1) and Compassionate Cultivation, the other one, received the approval nearly two months after (October 31).

The availability of MMJ for patients in Texas depends on these dispensaries’ ability to grow and process the medicinal products. The first dispensary will begin its operations from Schulenburg, a small town that lies midway between one of the three major cities of the state (Houston, Austin and San Antonio). However, MMJ patients won’t be able to buy the product on site as per the law which has drawn strong criticism from MMJ advocates. The dispensary is only authorized to deliver its products to the mentioned metro areas of Texas.

Critics think Texas MMJ law will serve no actual purpose to the patients

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Texas medical marijuana law has already been severely criticized for its sluggish implementation. However, troubles don’t end here for Texans because the state’s medical marijuana law is one of the most restraining ones in the entire US.

  • The biggest shortcoming of the law is the restriction of THC content to only 0.5% of the whole composition of the medicinal products. The amount of cannabidiol is also set at only 10%. The thing which makes this law more infuriating is that these limits are set on all products, from herbs to oils to tinctures and even for topical preparations.
  • Patients are not allowed to grow cannabis plants at home and smoking cannabis is also not included in the list of medicinal use.
  • Texas MMJ program also virtually becomes useless for patients because it has only one qualifying medical condition. And even for this, patients are required to get prescription from two eligible physicians.

Physicians and business owners are also not happy

Physicians raised their concern about the language of the bill which can lead physicians into trouble as per federal law and hence many are already reluctant to become a part of state’s budding MMJ program.

10 companies which applied for the MMJ licenses have sent a joint complaint letter to the Governor office and the Department of Public Safety citing that the law restricts them to produce useful medicinal products. With all these issues with Texas Marijuana program, it seems imminent it will fail even before its full implementation.

The post Texas Medical Cannabis Law: A Legislation Full of Faults appeared first on I Love Growing Marijuana.

Original article from ilovegrowingmarijuana.com:Texas Medical Cannabis Law: A Legislation Full of Faults


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