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Much Ado About RICO
Author: Will Patterson 14/07/2017 - 14:28:00

Our Oregon lawyers have been fielding many questions regarding a recent civil RICO complaint filed in the federal court in Portland, Oregon styled as McCart v. Beddow et al. This case was filed on the heels of the Safe Streets decision out of Colorado that we discussed recently, and was clearly heavily influenced by that decision. You will recall that in Safe Streets, the Tenth Circuit allowed a private civil RICO action by a neighbor of a cannabis grow operation to survive a motion to dismiss. 

As a reminder, RICO is a federal statute that provides for a civil cause of action for acts performed as part of an ongoing criminal organization (in addition to criminal penalties). It has become fashionable for meddlesome neighbors to bring these lawsuits against cannabis operators and their business affiliates. Because RICO complaints sound in federal law and implicate supply chain defendants, these cases differ from your ordinary nuisance-and-tresspass actions, which pursue only the marijuana grower itself, and also have been recently brought against Oregon marijuana growers. 

Though McCart shares many similarities to the facts in Safe Streets, it is the differences that make things interesting. These differences let us tease out a couple of lessons for other cannabis companies seeking to avoid a similar lawsuit. 

First the similarities: Plaintiffs in both suits are bringing RICO claims against neighboring cannabis grow operations and alleging direct injuries to plaintiffs’ properties in the form of noxious odors that allegedly reduce property values. They also allege the mere presence of a “criminal enterprise” next door decreases property values.

But McCart is not Safe Streets. Taking the McCart complaint on its face, the direct operators of the neighboring grow operation are alleged to have gone out of their way to intentionally provoke the Plaintiffs at every turn. This isn’t just a case about noxious odors and neighboring criminal enterprises (although it is that); rather, the Plaintiffs are asserting this case is the culmination of a bitter dispute between neighbors in which cannabis is more of an extra than a star.

Specifically, the McCart Plaintiffs allege that:

  • The defendant cannabis growers menaced Plaintiffs and “made obscene gestures” and “screamed obscenities” at Plaintiffs;
  • The grow operation increased traffic on a shared driveway by an excessive amount;
  • The Defendants caused direct injuries to the property by leaving tire tracks on Plaintiffs’ property;
  • The Defendants revved their car engines when they saw Plaintiffs outside;
  • The Defendants “discharge firearms for extended periods”;
  • The Defendants frequently “blast the air horn of their dump truck”;
  • The Defendants damaged the shared driveway and at times blocked it; and
  • The Defendants littered on Plaintiffs’ property.

Whether these allegations are true will be Plaintiffs’ burden to prove. However, two immediate lessons come to mind:

Lesson 1: To paraphrase Wil Wheaton: don’t be a jerk. Be a good neighbor. If the McCart allegations are true, the behavior of these growers reflects poorly on the entire industry. If you want to be treated like a serious business, act like one. Recognize the precarious legal situation afforded by inane prohibition policies, and strive to be ideal neighbors.

Lesson 2: Control the odors. The Safe Street court found that the cannabis smell released by the Colorado grow op was enough to assert a claim for RICO damages. You should do everything you can to minimize odors on your businesses.

But what about the other McCart defendants?

Like in Safe Streets, the McCart plaintiffs seem to have sued everyone even tangentially related to their hated neighbors, including cannabis dispensaries that just happened to stock the neighbors’ products. These “Dispensary Defendants” are probably in much better shape than the growers.

A civil RICO claim under 18 U.S.C. Section 1962(c) (at issue in both Safe Streets and McCart) requires a plaintiff prove:

  • The existence of an enterprise affecting interstate or foreign commerce;
  • The specific defendant was employed by or associated with the enterprise;
  • The specific defendant conducted or participated in the conduct of the enterprise’s affairs;
  • The specific defendant’s participation was through a pattern of racketeering activity; and
  • Plaintiff’s business or property was injured by reason of defendant’s conducting or participating in the conduct of the enterprise’s affairs.

In Reves v. Ernst & Young, the US Supreme Court held that the language of 1962(c) requires the defendant have “participated in the operation or management of the enterprise itself.” (page 183). There are a few out of jurisdiction cases that have held that mere business relationships and supplier-purchaser relationships are insufficient to establish RICO liability, even with knowledge of the illegal activity. If you are curious, take a look at In re Mastercard Intl. Inc., (page 487) and Arenson v. Whitehall Convalescent & Nursing Home, Inc. It seems unlikely the Dispensary Defendants in this case had anything to do with operating or managing the enterprise. They appear to have merely been customers, in which case they shouldn’t have liability here.

Though there is a dispensary defendant in Safe Streets, the Tenth Circuit appears to have found the conduct requirement was met because the Safe Streets defendants admitted they all “‘agreed to grow marijuana for sale’ at the facility adjacent to the [plaintiffs’] property.” The Safe Streets dispensary defendant was directly involved in operating the specific grow operation at issue. This is not the same thing as an innocent dispensary accepting product from a third-party farm.

We will be watching this case and reporting back if anything of importance breaks, but in the meantime, it never hurts to be a good neighbor, and to take steps to minimize odors.

Original article from cannalawblog.com:Much Ado About RICO



15/12/2017 - 21:23:00
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